The Movie Locke and The Morality of Telling the Truth

‘Mastery of small, telling gestures’: Tom Hardy as a man who goes awol in Locke.

Warning – There are some small spoilers for the movie Locke in this piece.  However, there is nothing that gives anything away that should spoil the ending or your enjoyment of the movie.  

Last night I saw the movie Locke starring Tom Hardy.  I knew very little about the film before I saw it, other than it was a one man show where Hardy spends the entire movie in a car, and what little I thought I knew outside of that was wrong.  For some reason I thought that it had something to do with crime, but it did not. I thought I was renting a criminal thriller, although one with a unique premise, but the movie, although it kept you on your seat the way a thriller does, was way more interesting and unique than your typical thriller.  

The movie is a story of a man that makes a moral mistake in his life, the only one from what we can tell, but a big one.  He has gotten a woman pregnant that he barely knows.  He is in charge of large concrete construction jobs and after finishing one of his buildings he sleeps with the woman after they share two bottles of wine.  His reason for sleeping with this woman is that she is a very sad person, who has a very lonely and unfulfilling life, and he feels bad for her.  However this act and all other characters are never seen.  We only know what is going on in the title character’s life, Ivan Locke, because of conversations he has on his car phone on the way to the hospital on the night this woman is to give birth.  

The character of Locke is not only married, but also has a historical concrete pour set to take place the next day.  He decides that it is the right thing to do to be by this woman’s side as she has a baby, because it is his mistake that it is being brought into the world.  He has to inform his family that he will not be home and his coworkers that he will not be at the concrete pour.  This is what the drama of the movie comes from.  It seems like a very simple story, but it is completely captivating.  

One of the things motivating Locke is that he never knew his father until he was in his 20’s.  He despises his father as he has a bunch of one man imaginary conversations with his father about how he wants to be a better man than him.  He doesn’t want the baby to grow up not knowing who he is.  

At the center of this film is a series of moral questions about what happens when we tell the truth.  Locke decides to be truthful with everyone involved.  Will he be ultimately rewarded or punished for telling the truth?  Does telling the truth matter more than the possibility of either the reward or punishment?  Is Locke acting morally when he tells his wife about what he has done, or is he destroying his family and causing unneeded pain?  

This is a film that could be discussed in a philosophy class, but it never seems like it while you are watching it.  It has the pace and excitement of a thriller.  It could be a one man play, but the cinematography and the music are highly cinematic and compelling.  I couldn’t help but think of other movies that have beautiful shot night sequences like Heat, Lost In Translation, or Drive.  

Tom Hardy is simply one of the best actors living and breathing today.  He is always able to transform himself completely into whatever character he is playing.  Watch him in Bronson, Warrior, or this movie and you will see a completely different and believable character on the screen.  Although there is no doubt that the writing and directing are absolutely superb in this movie, it says a lot that his performance, at the center of the film, is completely captivating.  

Whether you come to this movie to view it as a very well done piece of entertainment, or are looking for something deeper, I have no doubt that it will be worth your time.  

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