Joe Strummer – Earthquake Weather

For some reason the first Joe Strummer solo record, Earthquake Weather, always gets overlooked.  I’ve never understood that. Even though I hadn’t heard it for years, songs such as Gangsterville and Island Hopping have always stuck with me.  The album features his usual eclectic arrangements and rambling poetry.  There are a few duds in the bunch, as all experiments don’t land, but overall this is a interesting and worthy addition to his catalog.  It creates its own little world, somewhere between The Clash and his later experiments with the Mescaleros, though slightly looser than both.

Tonight

Tonight my band No Show Ponies will be playing at Hole in the Wall in Austin at 9pm.  I try not to over promote my own shit on here, as I want this site to have value in and of itself.  However, tonight is a special show as my brother moved away a year ago and this is one of the very few times we may get to play music together for the immediate future.  Above is a Joe Strummer song that we often cover.  “Going to the Mountaintop”!

If you want to hear us here is a link to our record that we recorded two years ago in Austin with Ramsay Midwood at the helm.  Recording mostly live to some quarter inch analog tape.  You can stream the album in full.

No Show Ponies Tonight at One 2 One

If you live in the Austin area tonight my band No Show Ponies is playing at One 2 One at 11:30pm.  We’ll be playing songs off of our new album A Manual for Defeat and some songs we love by Lou Reed, David Bowie, Joe Strummer, and others as well.

I also would like to announce that No Show Ponies has begun working with Little Gotham Media.  This is a company run by Shawn Christian Cochran, who is an old friend of ours.  We are looking forward to a fruitful partnership.

In the future when all’s well…

Link to A Manual for Defeatwww.noshowponies.bandcamp.com

Link to Little Gotham Media’s FB page:  www.facebook.com/pages/Little-Gotham-Media/436445623113554

Quote

Straight to Hell

If you can play on the fiddle
How’s about a British jig and reel?
Speaking King’s English in quotation
As railhead towns feel the steel mills rust water froze
In the generation
Clear as winter ice
This is your paradise

There ain’t no need for ya
There ain’t no need for ya
Go straight to Hell boys
Go straight to Hell boys

Y’wanna join in a chorus
Of the Amerasian blues?
When it’s Christmas out in Ho Chi Minh City
Kiddie say papa papa papa papa papa-san take me home
See me got photo photo
Photograph of you and Mamma Mamma Mamma-san
Of you and Mamma Mamma Mamma-san
Lemme tell ya ’bout your blood bamboo kid.
It ain’t Coca-Cola it’s rice.

Straight to Hell, boys
Go straight to Hell, boys
Go straight to Hell, boys
Go straight to Hell, boys
Oh Papa-san
Please take me home
Oh Papa-san
Everybody they wanna go home
So Mamma-san said

You wanna play mind-crazed banjo
On the druggy-drag ragtime U.S.A.?
In Parkland International
Hey! Junkiedom U.S.A.
Where procaine proves the purest rock man groove
And rat poison
The volatile Molotov says-

Go straight to Hell, boys
Go straight to Hell, boys
Straight to Hell

Oh Papa-San
Please take me home
There ain’t no need for ya,
There ain’t no need for ya

Go straight to Hell, boys
Go straight to Hell, boys

Can you cough it up loud and strong
The immigrants
They wanna sing all night long
It could be anywhere
Most likely could be any frontier
Any hemisphere
No man’s land
Ain’t no asylum here
King Solomon he never lived round here

Straight to Hell, boys
Go straight to Hell, boys
Go straight to Hell, boys
Go straight to Hell, boys

Oh Papa-San
Please take me home
Oh Papa-San
Everybody, they wanna go home now

Straight to Hell by The Clash.  I walked several miles with my dog today around Austin’s Town Lake.  i always take in albums when I do so.  One of today’s albums was The Clash’s Combat Rock.  This song has always been one of my favorites by them or any band.  The music is both beautiful and haunted.  Some lyricists try to get to a point by the straightest possible line.  The Clash were always great with throwing out a bunch of expansive poetic imagery.  You know what they are getting at, but it’s interpretive at the same time.  Let me tell ya ’bout your blood bamboo kid / It ain’t Coca-Cola it’s rice.