The Past is Not Past

I spent most of the day either at rehearsal or learning about Stonewall Jackson.  S.C. Gwynne has written another captivating book.  I’m not far enough into it to feel that I can talk about it, but there is no question that Jackson was a “unique” individual.  Today was one of those days that slipped through my grasp.  One minute I’m drinking coffee and the next the sun is going down.

After this recent election, which seems to defy reason, I have been looking for answers about our current political climate in our history and culture.  How did we arrive at this moment in time?  Take climate change for instance, something for which Obama just made a great step forward with his deal with China.  (I am still reading up on our deal with China for more specifics.)  The fact that climate change is occurring is scientific fact.  There is some uncertainty as to the exact outcome, but don’t get confused by the word uncertainty.  Think about if a large rainstorm came in.  You know that the ground will be soaked, but you can’t say for certain if the big oak tree out front is going to fall over.  That however, doesn’t mean it is not raining.  Anyway, so science and all reason point to climate change happening, yet not only does a portion of the populace not believe it is real, but we have elected officials that are not scientists, that claim they know more than scientists, going to be in charge of parts of our environmental policy.

Now there is no doubt that these people are for the most part bought and paid for by the fossil fuel industry.  You don’t have to be Columbo to deduce that.  You also don’t have to be Columbo to figure out that the regions with the most jobs in the fossil fuel industry are also the regions that are most against us doing anything about climate change.  Yet I don’t think it is as simple as a mere question of economics.

From the very beginning of our country there is an element that is against any kind of centralized authority.  Part of our country also puts faith above reason.  I just read in the Stonewall Jackson book last night that in 1850 Florida only had 85,000 inhabitants and half of them were slaves.  It is hard to imagine that modern Florida, with Disney World and Miami and the countless beach resorts, was created in 164 years, which is the lifespan of two humans.  Go to Miami and think about how two lives ago it was a desolate swamp.  As far as civilization goes our country is but a baby.

I am still thinking about all of this myself.  I wanted to ask those of you that read this a rhetorical question.  How does our unique American history and culture affect the way in which we think politically?  Places that were settled by different ethnic and religious groups often ended up quite different.  Places that had to subdue the land and keep people oppressed often ended up quite different than places that were booming with industry.  All of these things factor into who we are now.  How so?

She Doesn’t Want to be My “Friend”

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I am willing to gamble, when I get a friend request on Facebook, for which I don’t share any mutual friends, and picture two happens to be two hot girls with suggested lesbian intentions, that they don’t want to be my “friend”.  Call me crazy, but I’m pretty sure I’m not wrong…

A Divided Mind on the 4th of July

I find it kind of amusing that our country celebrates its birthday by blowing shit up, considering our foreign policy as of late.  When I was in Chicago there were so many fireworks going off that it sounded like a warzone.  I even saw a member of our entourage duck at one point because it was so loud it sounded like gunfire.  I couldn’t half blame him.  These weren’t fireworks that you could see, but just loud bangs going off at regular intervals with occasional whistling sounds like incoming.  I remembered the story of Devil’s Den from growing up near Gettysburg. 

The next day I read an article about how fireworks are bad for people with asthma, frighten dogs and other animals, and kill birds.  Nothing like a grand old tradition brought low.  

As one grows older and learns more you must develop the ability to live with a divided mind.  Or to put it another way, you must learn to be selectively crazy.  What did Slade sing about us all being crazy?

I was at a cookout recently in which I was there on a professional level.  Being that I am not a vegetarian could I enjoy the roasted pig knowing that pigs are as smart as dogs?  When one of the males made a crude comment about all the wives present, without any wit or knowing absurdity, should I just shrug it off or comment that he sounded like a dumbass? 

The show Curb Your Enthusiasm is so brilliant because Larry David so often says the things that we often want to, but manners and politeness keep us from doing so.  There are no easy answers.  So much of modern life is absurd that we must often choose the best path out of many bad ones.  It reminds me of a quote at the beginning of the Anthony Newley song Maladjusted: “On this glorious occasion of the splendid defeat.”

The Magic of Instagram

I am sitting in the studio looking over my instagram pictures.  It looks like I go from one exciting, strange, or fun moment to the next.  There is nothing there that demonstrates the dull mundane aspects that consume most of life.  Like there is no photo of me tripping over my pajama leg while going up the stairs and taking the Lords name in vain.  There is also no photo of me sitting on the couch yesterday like Jabba the Hut while my dog plays the role of Salacious Crumb, only getting up to eat.

I was thinking of these things and was going to write a long blog about how the digital world has erased those aspects of life that we don’t want people to see.  Those things we shouldn’t and wouldnt want people to see.  But after my trip to instagram I happened to scroll through facebook….