Thoughts On Clinton

I can’t say that I am either surprised or euphoric at the fact Hillary Clinton has declared to run for President.   We have all known that this was coming for some time.  Hillary is competent, far more so than the goons running for the Republicans. But as long as she has been in the public eye, I have no true sense of what she believes.  If you know American history, one will see that Bill was too often willing to sell out the working and middle class.  Like Reagan and Bush before him, and like W. after him, he took steps that helped lead to the financial meltdown of 2008. In many ways he was a conservative democrat.  Hillary, if entrusted with power, may be different, but there is no way to know that until she is entrusted with that power.  I am still hoping that Elizabeth Warren runs, though I am willing to listen to what Hillary has to say.  But anyway, any misgivings I may have about her are nullified by the complete insanity of the modern day GOP.  If it is between her and any of these flat earthers the Republicans are putting up, I will not only vote for Hillary, but canvass for her. 


Republicans Make Clowns of Themselves…Again

Obama: ‘I’m Embarrassed’ For Republicans Who Sent Letter To Iran

I really enjoyed Obama’s response to the Republicans who decided to put their names on a letter to Iran.  Conan O’Brien once compared Bill Clinton with The Road Runner, the way that Republicans would try to catch him and end up destroying themselves in the end.  I actually think Obama merits this comparison much more than Clinton, as Clinton was self-destructive in many obvious ways.  The Republicans are thrashing about climbing over each other to tarnish Obama, and their actions just make Obama look like the adult in the room.  I mean, think about what the Republicans did:  They reached out to the Ayatollah (The Ayatollah!) in an effort to weaken our Commander in Chief!  That is not only unprecedented, but batshit insane!  It is so insane that the remarks by the Ayatollah actually seem more reasonable than the Republicans.  I would like to be mad at this action, but it is so self-defeating that it seems more like a strange gift.  It is true that it is long enough before the next election that it may be forgotten by then.  But if it is not, and dear god I hope it is not, it will certainly be a plague on their house.

Death, Mortality, Abraham Lincoln, and His Secretary of War


If you want to know why Doris Kearns Goodwin’s Team of Rivals is such a thing of beauty, look no further.  The following two pages (at least on my Kindle) shows you how jam packed this book is with ideas and humanity.  Abraham Lincoln and Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton were polar opposites in personality, but were a perfect team when working together.  The one thing they both personally shared was a deep understanding of mortality due to the fact that both of them suffered the tremendous loss of loved ones.  As well as losing family members, Lincoln’s first love died when he was young.  Stanton lost his first wife at an early age.  Excerpt:

That Lincoln was also preoccupied with death is clear from the themes of many of his favorite poems that addressed the ephemeral nature of life and reflected on his own painful acquaintance with death.  He particularly cherished “Mortality,” by William Knox, and transcribed a copy for the Stantons.

Oh!  Why should the spirit of mortal be proud?
Like a swift-fleeting meteor, a fast-flying cloud,
A flash of lightning, a break of the wave,
He passeth from life to his rest in the grave.

He could recite from memory “The Last Leaf,” by Oliver Wendell Holmes, and once claimed to the painter Francis Carpenter that “for pure pathos” there was “nothing finer…in the English language” than the six-line stanza:

The mossy marble rest
On lips that he has prest
  In their bloom,
And the names he loved to hear
Have been carved for many a year
  On the tomb.

Yet, beyond sharing a romantic and philosophical preoccupation with death, the commander in chief and the secretary of war shared the harrowing knowledge that their choices resulted in sending hundreds of thousands of young men to their graves.  Stanton’s Quaker background made the strain particularly unbearable.  As a young man, he had written a passionate essay decrying society’s exaltation of war.  “Why is it,” he asked, that military generals “are praised and honored instead of being punished as malefactors?”  After all, the work of war is “the making of widows and orphans – the plundering of towns and villages – the exterminating & spoiling of all, making the earth a slaughterhouse.”  Though governments might argue war’s necessity to achieve certain objectives, “how much better might they accomplish their ends by some other means?  But if generals are useful so are butchers, and who will say that because a butcher is useful he should be honored?”  

Three decades after writing this, Stanton found himself responsible for an army of more than 2 million men.  “There could be no greater madness,” he reasoned, “than for a man to encounter what I do for anything less than motives that overleap time and look forward to eternity.”  Lincoln, too, found the horrific scope of the burden hard to fathom.  “Doesn’t it strike you as queer that I, who couldn’t cut the head off of a chicken, and who was sick at the sight of blood, should be cast into the middle of a great war, with blood flowing all about me?”